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The Crescent 



VOLUME XXXV 



NEWBERG, OREGON, JANUARY 9, 1924 



NUMBER 4 



DELEGATES REPORT 
INTERESTING TRIP 

Winter Weather, Crowds, and Good 
Time Impress Delegates 



The news from our delegates to 
the National Student Volunteer con- 
ference has been rather meager In so 
far as they are all busy attending 
the many attractions offered. The 
next Issue of the Crescent we hope, 
will contain a more complete ac- 
count of this very important con- 
vention. However, a few items have 
been gleaned concerning the trip 
and the early part of the confer- 
ence. The following extracts are 
those taken from letters of Florence 
Lee. our student woman delegate. 
Spokane, Christmas day, wonderful 
time! Miles City, Montana, Wednes- 
day. We have to write while the 
train is stopped. We were in snow 
and terrible wind all yesterday. In 
committee meeting yesterday, we ar- 
ranged for a vesper service to be at 
4:30 in the afternoon and forgot 
there wouldn't be any 4:30, because 
we changed our watches at 4:00. 
Were in Missoula for iftost an hour 
and a half because the signal ser- 
vice was out of order. This is such 
a dead country! I am glad I live 
in Oregon. 5:40 p. m. — Been hav- 
ing meetings most all day. Indian- 
apolis, Sunday afternoon. We have 
been having such warm weather that 
we sleep with the windows wide 
open. This afternoon we had de- 
nominational meetings under the 
direction of the different boards. Dr. 
Speer spoke. John R. Mott gave a 
wonderful talk this morning. Wil- 
liams Hotel, Indianapolis, December 
29. The blocks in this town are 
by far the longest blocks I ever saw 
in a city. Prom one street to an 
alley is as long or longer than a 
block In Portland. So when I say 
our hotel is only 9 blocks from the 
tabernacle you can Just remember 
that that means it is 'steen miles! 
December 30th. We had a dandy 
trip, two cars of Oregonians two of 
Washingtonians who had, besides 
their sleepers, a diner, an observa- 
tion car, and what we called a con- 
ference car. It was just a big day 
coach. We had a baby organ along 
so we had song fests, programs, ves- 
per srvlces, committee meetings, 
"n'everything all the time! In be- 
tween times we traveled around and 
got acquainted with different folks 
and always got out at every town 
where we stopped long enough, and 
got sufficient exercise to last 'till 
next time. The snow was deep In 
Spokane and cold In Idaho and part 
of Montana, but here they don't 
know what snow is and we're hav- 
ing almost warm weather. The meet- 
ings so far have been wonderful; I 
wish all the folks at home could at- 
tend them. 

A great deal of credit is due the 
members of the committee who had 
charge of the financial end for our 
delegates. By persistent and untir- 
ing efforts they managed to obtain 
pract*cally two hundred and sixty 
dollars. The amount was raised by 
canvassing the members of the stu- 



GREAT CAREERS AWAITING FRESHMAN PROPHESIED. POETIC OUT- 
BURST FORSEES BRILLIANT FUTURE FOR EACH MEMBER OF CLASS 



(Continued on page three) 



FRESHMAN CLASS 

Silence, you students and Fate shall 
reveal 

The future of Freshies, If they beg 
or steal 

In the long years to come, in '36 
All Sophomores will think Fate 

should surely revive. 
When they find how each Freshman 
earns much for his meal. 

Fate says with a grin, of each one 

will speak 
A president at Penn is our busy 

Chester 

And under him all the students are 
meek. 

Now bricklaying is easy for solemn 

Ralph Hester 
He found that for him education has 

payed. 

And Ethlyn, the shy little maid, 
Is now at society's peak. 
Edith draws two hundred each week 
As a seamstress she is a streak. 

Then next there is Elsie who surely 

can teach. 
She makes Latin and Algebra great 

fun for each. 
An expert big farmer is tall Edgar 

Street 

Just the kind that you always enjoy 

so to meet. 
Zell and Zella wrote a speech 
And now they lecture far and wide 
As they travel o'er the countryside. 
An excellent housewife is Esther 
And likewise bo is Marie Hester. 

Marguerite and Ruth, both latin 
sharks. 

Teach now In old Pacific College 
Esthel was so full of knowledge 
She started a school of facts. 
Eugene and Marlon have made their 
marks 

By building two new city parks; 
And Fleta owns two railroad tracks. 

Homer is a political fighter, 
Hllma and Hulda have a classy tea 
shop, 

They fill your orders on the dot. 
Mary is a foremost writer; 
Helen is editor of a leading paper. 
She has named It the "Village 
Vapor." 

The poetess of this piece Is very busy 
Writing a masterpiece that will 
knock you dizzy. 

Fate her little say has said 
Believe It or not, as you will. 
The Freshmen are not dead 
But ready to coast down the steepest 
hill. 



BASKET BALL 

The first game of the season is 
to be played on January 12th. with 
Linfield here at the gym. Everyone 
is expected to be there and help 
our fellows win that game. We 
want to start right in backing up 
our team and here Is our first 
chance. 



"I just got this light globe yes- 
terday and it's too young to be out 
at night," explained her father as 
he switched on the light in the 
parlor. 



ON FRESHMAN GREEN 

It is true — a large volume could 
not be written about the freshman 
as a class but despite our short his- 
tory we believe we have done enough 
to be of some use. Maybe it has 
been only as ornaments for the 
seniors or playthings for the 
eophomdres but even these are of 
some use. — to those who have to be 
amused. 

A bunch of deadbeats? But listen. 
How could twenty-two "greens" be 
other than lively? We have dis- 
played our colors and suffered the 
cruelties of the sophomores to good 
credit. But that Is only a begin- 
ning. This fall five of our men 
were on the gridiron. Four of these 
— Hester, Nordyke, Wlnslow, and 
Street — will receive letters. Hibbs 
was injured in an early game and 
was unable to play the rest of the 
season. 

This is only one example of our 
overflowing ■ class enthusiasm — a 
spirit that fits in with the order 
of the best of things. 

In class basketball we were de- 
feated by the sophomores but this 
was partly due to Inexperience in 
team work. 

In our class organization with 
Edgar Street as president, Esther 
Haworth as secretary, Marion Win- 
slow as treasurer, we have a high 
order among the best classes. 

Our scholarship, seeing that the 
majority of our class is girls, is 
high. By our enthusiasm and dili- 
gence all of our scholastic duties 
are easily dissolved. We have learn- 
ed that progress depends upon our 
ability to think, judge, decide and 
act upon our decision. Armed with 
this idea and with the hope of 
sometime becoming a vicious sopho- 
more or a dignified senior we will 
be, in the future, after bigger game. 
So to see a transformation or a sud- 
den widening it will only be nec- 
essary to watch our "green" fade 
and run. 



RECITAL AT W00D-HAR HALL 

A vocal and piano recital was 
given by pupils of the music depart- 
ment Monday evening, December 17, 
at Wood-Mar Hall. The songs and 
piano selections were of a varied 
type, making an interesting pro- 
gram in which many showed consid- 
erable talent. Of special interest 
was the concluding number, a piano 
duet, "Norwegian Dance," by Grieg, 
played by Professor Hull and Mrs. 
Eva Hummer Hull. 

Those giving vocal selections were 
Louise Nelson, Rose Ellen Hale, Es- 
ther Haworth, Hazel Blake, Bernlce 
Hinsha,w, Helen Hester, Eva Miles, 
Homer Hester, and Hubert Arm- 
strong. 

Those giving piano solos were 
Catherine Parker, Lorene Gettman, 
Ruth Whitlock. Florence Elliott and 
Rose Ellen Hale. 



Captain Billy's Idea of a fast guy 
is one who can turn out the light 
and get in bed before the room gets 
dark. — (Flamingo.) 



OLD STUDENTS ENJOY 
ANNUAL HOMECOMING 

Basketball, Social Hour, and Pro- 
gram Conclude Evening 

The old students turned out in 
fine array with several of the old 
athletic stars, for the basketball 
game which was the first part of the 
program Saturday evening. Owing 
to the distance some had to come 
It seemed Impossible for them to ar- 
rive at the scheduled time, but the 
game started off with good spirit 
at 7:45. Those playing on the old 
students team were Frank Colcord, 
"Soup" Newhouse, Ross Miles, Ger- 
ald Pearson, Sanford Brown, and 
Walter Cook. They fought well but 
most of them were out of practice 
and the game went to P. C's pres- 
ent team. 

After the game everyone met In 
Wood-Mar Hall where each was 
given a letter of the alphabet and 
all were told to divide into groups 
selecting letters to form a word. 
The group with the longest word 
was to receive a prize box of candy. 
When each group felt It had the 
prize almost in Its grasp the prize 
was found missing. Frantic was the 
search that followed but the candy 
did not appear — at least not for the 
benefit of all. 

The program which followed in 
the chapel proved to be very inter- 
esting and entertaining. Miss Win- 
ona Smith played a beautiful selec- 
tion on the violin, accompanied by 
Mrs. Cramlett. Professor Lewis sang 
"Dreamy Days" by Ashford and 
"Flower of My Heart" by Russell, 
which were greatly enjoyed. A high- 
ly amusing stunt was given por- 
traying the auto riding In 1910, 
1920 and 1930. The changes which 
took place In the three decades were 
very noticable. Mrs-. C. A. Morris 
sang t wo numbers in her usual 
charming way. 

The business meeting was called 
by the president and Miss Pauline 
Terrell elected president for the com- 
ing year. The collection was taken 
and the meeting adjourned. 

Following the business meeting 
punch and wafers were served in the 
hall below. After everyone had talk- 
ed and visited with everyone else 
the last car departed until next 
year. 



Y. W. CHRISTMAS MEETING 

The Y. W. C. A. held Its Christ- 
mas services on Wednesday morn- 
ing .December 19, In the chapel. The 
Y. M. C. A., on invitation, also 
attended this meeting. 

A short program, under the direc- 
tion of the Y. W. music committee, 
was presented in which we were 
taken back to the time of the birth 
of Christ and were then made to 
feel anew the true spirit of Christ- 
mas. "O Little Town of Bethlehem," 
"Joy to the World," "Silent Night." 
"Star of the East," and "Jerusalem" 
were sung interspersedly throughout 
the meeting and added much to the 
beauty and impresslveness of the 
service. 



Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 



THE CRESCENT 



Entered as second-class mail matter 
at Postoffice at Newberg, Ore. 



Published Semi-Monthly during 
the college year by the Student 
Body of Pacific College, Newberg, 
Oregon. 



Helen Robertson .... Editor-in-Chief 

Louise Nelson Associate Editor 

Ralph Hester Business Mgr. 

Eugene Hibbs Circulation Mgr. 

REPORTERS 
Hulda Winslow, Ralph Hester, 
Marie Hester, Philip Haworth, Edith 
Sanderman, Ether Haworth, Elsie 
Allen, Eugene Hibbs, Ruth Whit- 
lock, Pleta Leland, Chester Newlin, 
Hilma Hendrickson. 



Terms: $1.00 the Year In Advance. 
Single Copy 10c. 



CONCERNING NEW 

YEARS RESOLUTIONS 



Well, .here we are well launched 
on the- new year of . 1924. With 
Christmas and New Years day duly 
celebrated we are back again at 
school supposedly hard at work. 

With the semester's finals only one 
month away (little hints of thjs are 
constantly being dropped by our 
teachers and we are gently urged 
to prepare for the worst) we may 
ask ourselves, have we- made the 
most of this semester's work? 

Do you remember, Just one short 
year ago, about those rather firm 
little promises that you made to 
yourself, .promises that sounded 
something like thiB — I'll honestly try 
to get more out of this year's school- 
ing than I did last year; and I'm 
going to read several good books 
out of our library- I'm through 
procrastinating, and I'm going to 
make my teachers think that I am 
a bright and shining light mentally, 
and they will greet me with a new 
respect and point me out to other 
students as a shining example of 
diligence. 

Now, ask yourselves if you have 
kep{ these promises. Have you really 
received better grades this year or, 
the work being somewhat harder, 
have you dropped a few points? Do 
you forget those good resolves and 
put off your hardest subject until 
the last moment before recitation 
and then wbnder why your daily 
grades hover around the eighties? 
Are those books in the library still 
read by you, those shelves of the 
best books written, for the privalege 
of reading which you have paid 
a fee? Have you thought more 
about having a good time than hav- 
ing a good lesson? In short are you 
Just merely getting by or do you 
feel that you have kept- to a certain 
degree at least, those resolutions 
that you made in good faith? 

Of course you may not have 
thought seriously of the wrong of 
breaking a promise to yourself, but 
did you ever stop to consider that 
every promise that you make to 
yourself and then break, makes the 
next promise just a little harder to 
-keep and in your own mind your 
regard that promise a little less 
seriously? 

With the new year Just beginlng 
let's take an invoice of ourselves 
and see just exactly how far we 
have come: Let us try to live up 
to. these, worthy promises a little- 
more «hJBely and by this time next 
year, .be able to . look back- and rea- 
lize that we really have done better 
;and then for January first of next 
year be able to make more Tesolu- 
tions with a new confidence in our 
ability to keep them. 

At least we know that the fresh- 



men who by this time next year will 
all be sophomores of course, will 
have kept their resolutions. 



DRAMATICS 

Since we have the permission of 
the College Board to put on plays 
it is up to us to do our part and 
prove that we can. 

There is plenty of ability in the 
student body to put on several plays 
a year if we would only get to 
work at it. The high school gives 
three or four plays each year; why 
don't we? It is an execellent way 
to earn money. 

If we do not get busy at this mat- 
ter we are soon going to wake up 
to the fact that the school year is 
half over and as yet no plans begun 
for any sort of dramatics. 

Dramatics will not only help the 
school financially but it will also 
promote teamwork and fellowship. 
If we put on a play the student 
body will have to get behind it and 
push. They will all be working to- 
gether for the same purpose and it 
will create a closer fellowship among 
all of the students. 

Come on now, let's get busy and 
show the town we have some talent 
Up here. 



A WORD FROM BULLETIN BOARD 

Of all the messiest messes this is 
the worst I've ever been in. The 
students around here don't have 
much idea of the proper. The way 
they plaster me up with notices and 
lost and found signs is simply scan- 
dalous. I am a respectable law abid- 
ing bulletin board and I do not ap- 
preciate being loaded down with 
numerous advertisements, week-old 
class notices, and assignments. I 
would appreciate it greatly if some 
one would remove the old notices 
from my front; I have quite enough 
to do in holding up the present and 
future without the past. 

I am the main attraction in the 
hall ;the most looked upon; and the 
most talked about — Isn't that reason 
enough for wanting to look my best? 

P. S. — I am not a handkerchief 
rack. 



CHAPEL TALKS 

Professor C. L. Conover illustrated 
his chapel talk by an interesting 
story about the straightening of a 
great Bteel shaft in a large factory. 
This story left two Impressions upon 
the minds of many of the students. 
One of these was that it is best to 
decide what to do and the method 
to be used before starting a given 
task. The other wos to make sure 
that you are right and then keep 
at the job in spite of the jeers and 
comments of the on-lookers. 

During the chapel period of Dec- 
ember 21, 1923, the students of 
Pacific listened to a very' interest- 
ing talk given by Professor Miche- 
ner on the subject "What is School 
spirit." In his talk Mr. Michener 
showed that it is not a winning foot- 
ball team, a large enrollment of stu- 
dents, a good song or yell leader, 
or a large endowment fund that 
makes the real spirit of any school. 
He gave three things necessary for 
school spirit. The first requirement 
is concentration, and closely con- 
nected with it is cooperation. The 
last is constructive, frank criticism 
— that kind of criticism which tends 
to build up and make better rather 
than tear down and destroy. 



MARVELOUS BRAIN DISCOVERED 

Doc Crozer's brains have been ex- 
amined and experts have watched 
the workings of his gray matter for 
some time. In fact noted medical 
men from the east have sat upon 
them and pronounced Mr. Crozer's 
brains scientifically wonderful. Doc 
thought of the name for our Acad- 
emy sheet. 



DORMITORY VACATION 

Of course we all like school but 
nevertheless we are always ready for 
vacations when they roll around. 
Friday and Saturday witnessed the 
departure of many of the dormitory 
bunch for home. Those who were 
denied that priviledge however did 
not Buffer from the want of a good 
time. Many and various were the 
pastimes of the remaining few. Their 
greatest delight was to sleep until 
ten o'clock in the morning, then 
have breakfast around the kitchen 
fire. The boys, including Prof. 
Newlin, became quite well trained 
in the art of dish washing. Many 
interesting and hotly contested vol- 
ley ball games added much to the 
fun and jollity. A game of rook 
now and then helped to fill in the 
time. Three evenings were delight- 
fully spent at the homes of Browns, 
Mr. and Mrs. Michener, and Mr. and 
Mrs. Perisho, 



Christmas day was a day when 
eats were not lacking at the dorm- 
itory, and those that did not go home 
did not lack anything for a big 
Christmas as their folks at home 
sent turkey, chickens, spuds, cakes, 
doughnuts, pies, fruit, nuts, candies, 
and everything that go to make up 
a Christmas dinner. 



New Years eve a few outside ' of 
the dormitory gathered to help 
watch the old year out and the new 
year In. 

Excitement was not lacking when 
the dinner bell was rung wildly out 
of the front window of the girls' 
dormitory one night about 10 o'clock 
rousing the boys from their 
Bound dumber and bringing them 
flying. After all it was nothing but 
a false alarm and as the offending 
parties have been forgiven we need 
not go Into details. For further in- 
formation see . 

Of course this is only a sample of 
the glorious good times. We do not 
dare tell them all because we are 
afraid if we did everyone would 
want to stay at the dormitory dur- 
ing vacation. 



Leona Brown spent a few days 
with Helen Nordyke on her way to 
Monmouth where she is attending 
school the next few months. 



Mrs. John Dotson and small son 
spent a few doys with her sister, 
Helen Nordyke Christmas vacation. 



NEWBERG TRANSFER CO. 
Local and Long Distance 
HAULING 

PHONE WHITE 187 



FORDS 

WE SELL 'EM 

WE FILL 'EM 

WE FIX 'EM 

NEWBERG MOTOR CO. 



Black 122 Office White 22 

DR. H. C. DIXON 
DENTIST 



HOME CASH GROCERY 
Quality and Service 
3(12 FIRST STREET 



We wish yon a Happy and 
Prosperous New Year 



LARKEN PRINCE HARDWARE 
COMPANY 



Resolved to give you the same 
cheerful service during 1924 



CITY GROCERY 
Call Black 231 for Fresh Fruits 
and Vegetables and Your 
Grocery Wants 
714 FIRST STREET 



College Students are Always Wel- 
come at 
THE BEX ALL STORE 
Lynn B. Ferguson 
PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST 



GEO. WARD'S BARBER SHOP 

Satisfaction 
Guaranteed 

NEXT TO YAMHILL ELECTRIC 



FRANK B. LAYMAN 
Attorney-at-Law 
First National Bank Building 



STUDENTS— 

For the easiest shave 
and most up-to-date 
hair cut, go to 

JAMES McGUtKE 

OPPOSITE (THE POST OFFICE 



PARLOR PHARMACY 

H. A. COOLEY, Prop. 

Ice Cream and Candies 
Kodaks, Cameras and Supplies. 



Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 



An Electric Washing Machine 

Makes LABOR DAY a pleasantry 

YAMHILL ELECTRIC CO. 

"IT SERVES YOU RIGHT" 



Anderson Motor 
Company 

STAR AND 
STUDEB AKER 

Sales and Service 

Associated Oil Products 
GENUINE FORD PARTS 



PERSONAM 

Marguerite treated the college 
Latin class to centennials. 

We are all wondering who did it, 
lor we notice that Florence Heater 
has lost a lot of hair. 

Edna Doree, Helen Baird, Eliza- 
beth Silver, and Hazel Newhouse 
were home from Willamette and vis- 
ited P. C. Jan. 3. 

Eight of our faculty members at- 
tended the state teachers associa- 
tion which was in session at Lin- 
coln High, December 27-29. 

Prof. Newlln spent Christmas eve 
and Christmas morning at Penning- 
tons and hung his No. 4 stocking by 
President Pennington's No. 12 at the 
fireplace for Santa to fill. 

Zella Straw spent Christmas holi- 
days with friends at Eugene. Prof. 
Weesner may be the strongest on 
tangents but Zella's mind wandered 
around Tangent at least five hours 
on her journey hqme. 

Walter Stanbrough reports that 
he did nothing during vacation, but 
when questioned closely it develop- 
ed that he spent two days in Port- 
land. Emma Fort also reluctantly 
confessed, having been in Portland 
but : we could obtain no further de- 
tails. 

Margaret te Beck played the good 
girl Santa Claus on Iris Hewitt. The 
week before Christmas' you could 
•hear Margarette joyfully shout at 
every misdemeanor of Iris,' "There 
goes a nickle oft your Christmas 
present!" By Christmas she had ar- 
rived at the ten cent mark. So she 
came to Sherwood with her gift and 
spent Christmas day with Iris. 

When a semester has -only four 
more weeks of duration the thoughts 
of pupils and Instructors turn nat- 
urally but regretfully to examina- 
tions. Prof...Lewis has already be- 
gun to prepare the French I class 
for the low grades . they probably 
will receive by telling them of slm- 
. liar marks previously received by 
other' French classes. Prof. Lewis 
Intimated that foreign language 
classes seldom receive high grades 
and that his present class is no 
exception. 



TEEFIAN j 

The Treflan Christmas program of 
■ December 19th was very interesting 
and instructive. The girls met in 
the dormitory parlors which were 
decorated in' keeping with the 
Christmas season. After a short 
business session a pantomine of 
"Our first rememberance of Christ- 
mas" was given by Mary Elliott and 
; Florence Heater. This proved to be 
very unique and ' -clever. "Sijent 
Night, Holy Night" was sung by the 
society. Miss Lee told the story of 
the "Other Wise Man" in a pleasing 
and -Interesting manner and instilled 
a desire to do good and' receive- 
• Christ's blessing as was given the 
"Other Wise Man." After the critic's 
report- the meeting adjourned. 



NOTICE TO WOULD-BE TEEFIANS 

.If, just before Trefian initiation, 
you hear rumors that lima beans are 
to be plentiful on the fateful night, 
be sure to wear a rather large middy 
tie — a black one preferred. One of 
the above mentioned articles proved 
very convenient during the lima 
bean race which was a part of the 
last Treflan initiation program. 



V 



NOTICE TO TEEFIANS 

To all present members of the 
Trefian literary society, who expect 
to take part in any future initiation 
programs to be conducted by that 



THE P. A. ASKTJS 

"VOL. I NO. 1 

Entered in the Crescent as very 
classy matter. 

Published every time by the Cres- 
cent. 

Philip Haworth Editor 

George Foott Assoc. Ed. 

Retha Tucker Fourth Yr. News 

Rose Ellen Hale Third Yr. News 

Johanna G-errlts. . .Second Yr. News 

Mabel Kendall First Yr. News 

Ben Huntington Specials 

Ivor Jones Specials 

Editorial Policy 

1. Get the best news, in the best 
style, and we'll have the best paper. 

2. Boost Pacific Academy. 

3. Back Pacific College. 

OUR PAPEE 

Something new is being started 
with this issue of the Crescent. The 
Academy news from now on will be 
edited by our own Academy staff, 
and published In the Crescent under 
the name of the P. A. ASKUS. Al- 
though the Crescent is primarily the 
organ of Pacific College, It Is pub- 
lished by the Associated Student 
Body, which includes the Academy. 
So at the suggestion of the Cres- 
cent editors an Academy staff was 
selected to- edit- the Academy news. 
Let's keep on and finish what we 
have started. 



Fourth Year Notes 
Emmabell Woodworth and Alice 
Laudlen spent New Years at Pacific 
City. 

Elizabeth Silver, Helen Balrd and 
Hazel Newhouse of the Academy 
class of 1923, were home from 
Willamette University for the Christ- 
mas vacation and were Pacific vis- 
itors. 

George Foott spent Christmas va- 
cation in Portland and it was re- 
ported that he saw Santa Claus per- 
sonally. 

Glen' Brown has been working in 
the Portland post office for the paBt 
two weeks. 

Miss Lee (in physics class) — "I 
want to propose — " 

Philip — "Go ahead, this is leap 
year." 

Miss Lee — "a new system." 

Mildred C. — "Be careful Floyd, 
if you tear a hole In my hair net 
I'll catch cold." 



de- 
Mc- 



society this suggestion. &>eeap«tful!y .' v Percy Hollan dspent Christmas? at 



submitted: be sure, unless all appll- 
f cants for admission . arrive «ar4i, 
I that all window -"blinds' are : lowered'. 
\ especially if a nice tall wood pile 
-happens to be near those windows. 



Second Year Notes 
Audrey Chenowlth ispent a 

lightful vacation at Gearhart. 
Homer Hester and Landon 

Cracken vacationed at the coast. 

Homer learned to skate beautifully. 

We wish we could have watched him 

learn. 

Wm, Lar is with us again after 
having spent several weeks at Hood 
River and The Dalles. 

Mrs. MIchener's class wish to 
thank her for the Christmas gift. 
It is greatly appreciated. 

Elsie Reed has made a New Year's, 
resolution not to study during vaca- 
tions. 

Roland Schaad has been rabbit 
bunting recently. 

It has been remarked that Landon 
McCracken makes a good jumping 
jack. We are stilt wondering why 
he was not given away by Santa. 

Gravity seems to be gaining force 
in English n class. Comment: We 
always thought that gravity had a> 
great deal of force whenever we 
have met it. ' 



.First Year Notes 



Cashmere, Wash., during the holi- 
days. 

Burr Dunlap had an exciting ex- 
perience during vacation. 

ACADEMY WILL HAVE 

WIN NING TEAM 

Prospects for this season of 
basketball are better for the Acad- 
emy than they have been for years. 
With three lettermen back, two good 
men to fill up the vacancies and a 
strong second string, the results 
should certainly be much better than 
in previous years. 

Jones, the new center, though 
lacking some in experience is play- 
ing a good brand of ball. Chamber- 
lain, the other new man, playing 
guard, promised to be the star of the 
team because of his fight. Everest 
the other guard, is going better 
than ever before because of his work 
with the rest of the team. Bill 
Sweet, captain and forward, is play- 
ing his same old brand of ball, in 
other words, 100 per cent. And 
Huntington, the other forward, 
keeps dropping- -the ball into the 
basket as' regular as water drops 
from a leaky faucet. These men 
should work up a strong team both 
in defense and offense for with 
such men as Elliott, Kendall, Mc- 
Cracken, Holllngsworth, Hester, Ter- 
rell, Gatch and Foott opposing them 
they will have to work hard to 
retain their positions. 

Coach Mlchener is working hard 
with the squad, teaching -new plays, 
new forms of defense and offense, 
and new principles that will surely 
strengthen the team. It is certain 
that no one can blame him if the 
team is not a success. But qne 
thing additional is needed and that 
is the support of the student body. 



DELEGATES EEPOET 

INTERESTING TRIP 



(Continued from page one) 



dent body, the faculty, and all those 
who were Interested. The members 
of the committee were Miss Mary 
Sutton, Eva Miles, chairman, "Virgil 
HinBhaw, Albert Reld and Florence 
Heater. Mr. Perisho, Mr. Conover, 
and Mr. Newlin were on the church 
committee. 

Two pie sales and an arm band 
sale and seyeral peanut, sales were 
given, the proceeds of which were 
very substantial. 



-r-\ 



C. A. HOEEIS 
OPTICIAN 
JEWELER 



CLARENCE BUTT 
Attorney 

Office second floor Union Block 



DB. THOS. W. HESTER 

Physician and Surgeon 

Office in Dixon Building 
NKWBERG, -:- OREGON, 

, , — iSii ! S 



Mollala, Oregon 

Vernon Ego went to Junction City 
for his vacation and nearly froze to; 
death. | j 

Margaret Haug went home to 



Sherlock's Restaurant 

BIG EATS FOE 
LITTLE MONEY 



J. C. POETEE & CO. 
General Merchandise 
Your patronage appreciated 
PHONE BLACK 28 



ELLIOTT TIRE SHOP 

for , .. 

TIRES AND TUBES 

Vulcanizing and. Eepairing 
Umbrellas Repaired 



C. J. BEEIEE COMPANY 

Everything in Men's Furnishings 

at Seasonable Prices 
CLOTHING SHOES 



KTENLE & SONS 
PIANOS 
Musical Merchandise 

MUSIC, STATIONERY, ETC. 
504 First St. , : Nawberg,' Ore. 



Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 



NEWBERG BAKERY 

404 First Street 

Best of Bread: Finest Cakes. 
Pies like Mother used to make. 



All Kinds of 
GROCERIES AND CANDY 

J. L. VAN BLARICOM'S 
Let us quote you prices 



BOB WALKER 
Shde Shine Parlor 
Ladies' Suede Shoes a' Speciality 

CANDIES AND GUM 
STAGE DEPOT 



• — — ^i' ' > 

A Word 

to the Wise is sufficient 
Compare Quality as well as Price 
What you eat and, wear get' \ 

Miller Mercantile Co. 

"Good Goods" 



Newberg 
Restaurant 

The only one that has 



Good 
WaMes 



— \ 



ROBERT CROUSB, Prop. 



SB. JOHN S. RANKIN 
Physician & Surgeon 
Office Phone Black 171 
Residence Phone Gray 171 
Office over U. 8. National Bank 



E. C. BAIRD 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

We Appreciate Your Patronage 
Phone Red 37 

Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 
>■ ' 

DR. A. M. DAVIS DR. I. R. ROOT 
DENTISTS 
Over Ferguson's Drug Store 
Phone White 38 



20TH CENTURY COFFEE 

Roasted Today 
On your table tomorrow 

20TH CENTURY GROCERY 

702 First St. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 
We Deliver 

PHONE BLUB 220 



A. C. SMITH 

Dealer in Leather Goods 
Auto Tops a Speciality 

703 First Street 



EVANS 
PHOTOGRAPHER 
KODAK FINISHING 



Will B. Brooks 
Printer 

410 First St, Phone Black 22 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS 
Cleaning Pressing; Repairing 

RYGG THE TAILOR 

PHONE BLACK 180 



EVANS 
PLUMBING COMPANY 

211 First Street 



ECONOMY CLEANERS 
AND DYERS 

ELGIN VAN BLABICOM 



Y. M. C. A. 

Mr. Asa Sutton gave the Y. M. 
C. A. a very Interesting talk on last 
Wednesday evening. His subject was 
inventory. A comparison was made 
between the success of a mercantile 
company and a person's life. 

He told how the mercantile com- 
pany at the beginning of the year 
makes an inventory of all its goods, 
and that always as they look back 
on the past year certain departments 
are found to be unprofitable, so are 
discontinued for the new yeaiv "The 
main thing sought for is that figure 
in the lower right hand corner," 
said Mr. Sutton. "For this figure is 
the item standing for the net profit 
for the past year." 

He said that Just as the mercantile 
company found unprofitable depart- 
ments, we find, as we look back 
over the past year, departments of ; 
our lives which have been unprofit- ' 
able, and so should plan to discard 
these things for the coming year, j 
The thing to be looked for in our • 
lives is the net profit, and if wo 
cannot find anything worth while 
gained then our year has not been 
a success, even as the department 
store which comes to the end of a 
year with no profit is considered a 
failure. 



THE PAGEANT 

The Christmas program, the pa- 
geant, was held at the Friends 
church Sunday afternoon. The 
chureh was beautifully decorated In 
green foliage and holly. 

The first number of the program 
was a violin solo, the remainder of 
the time was spent on the play. The 
leading parts were taken by Wilbur 
Elliott, who was the modern Quaker. 
Helen Nordyke represented the 
Christmas spirit, Ma.ry Elliott took 
the part of Christian love, and 
Stanley Kennall, The Freedom of 
Spirit. Six mission fields were rep- 
resented: Mexico, Palestine, Cuba, 
Jamacla, West China and Africa. 
They all met together for a Joyful 
Christmas tide through the spirit the 
Quakers are sending to them. They 
closed with the song, "Holy, Holy, 
Holy." The play was enjoyed by all 
present. 



AGORETON NOTES 

The Agoretona gave a very inter- 
esting program after so long an 
absence. At least the program sound, 
ed interesting, and we suppose they 
gave it. However they must have 
met during the holidays. The Tre- 
fians were sorry they could not at- 
tend. 

The following program was ren- 
dered : 

The Death of the Society 

Albert Wlndell 

Latest Methods of Embalming De- 

funet Members... Virgil Hinshaw 

Epitaphs Royal Gettyman 

Song "Forsaken".. Society 

We are anxious for the next pro- 
gram to be posted. 



NOTES 

Christmas began early for P. A. 
when Miss Lee, playing Santa, pass- 
ed cunning little oranges to the 
students, Friday, Dec. 21, Each one 
went off with a grin on one side of 
his face, and an orange in the other, 
calling "Merry Christmas." 

The Alg. HI class were all bliss- 
fully happy when each one received 
an all-day sucker for getting a per- 
fect lesson for that day. 

Homer Hester ft Co. had a skat- 
ing party recently. 

Rose Ellen and Bernlce went home 
to sunny California (the land of the 
lemon) for their vacation. 

Ted Chamberlain ft Co. also had 
a skating party recently. 



Wail of the Seniors 

The saddest words of tongue of pen, 
Too many women, tog few men. 



NEWBERG CYCLE COMPANY 

Earl Hutchinson, Prop. 
The sporting goods store 
Motorcycles, Bicycles, Supplies 
and Repairing 



THE FAIR STORE 

CHRISTMAS GOODS 

now on display 

Come in and look around 
Wallace & Son 



W. H. BEST 

W. W. HOWBTT 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 
WATER METERS 



r 



The FamouB 
NEWBERG CANDY SHOP 

Has everything in the line of 
Home Made Candies 
Fancy Boxes and Cigars. 



Watches Jewelry Clocks 
E. G. REID 
Watch and Clock Repairing 
All Work Guaranteed 
906 First St. Newberg, Ore. 



CITY MEAT MARKET 
"The Home of Good Meats" 

Deliver before and after sehool 
Phone Red •« 
MOORE 4 SON 



W. W. H0LLTNGSW0RTH CO. 

STORE OF QUALITY 



S00 First St. 



Newberg, Ore. 



Yours for Service and Quality 
ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 
JASPER BALES, Proprietor 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
Newberg, Oregon 
KEEP YOUR RESERVE FUNDS WITH US 

INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 




DR. S. M WBMDT 
Snrgeoa 

Eye, Ear, Nose a*d Throat 

Calls answered to your home 
EDWARDS BLDO. NEWBERG 



Ralph W. VanVaBn X-Ray Diagnosis 



OVER U. S. BANK 



GAS ADMINISTERED 



Pacific Students: 

SUPPLIES AND SERVICE AT 

Parker Hardware Co. 

i 

UNITED STATES NATIONAL BANK 

Capital, Surplus and Profits 1128,000 

Accounts of students, faculty and friends of Pacific College Invited 
INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ESTBLI8HED 1888 



Graham's Drug Store 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES KODAK FINISHING 

HEADQUARTERS FOR PERIODICALS 



"Rosebud Flour" 

MONEY BACK IF NOT SATISFACTORY